Whiskey

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What ifs and other situations for discussion

• Someone wants to visit but can’t reach down to pet your dog • Someone grabs the leash or the animal • Someone who has had a visit already keeps calling the animal back or follows you • Animal urinates • Clients have no clothes on • Staff or visitors want to visit • What…

Protect against infection

As we have the potential of visiting those that may be susceptible to illness we need to ensure that we practice infection control. Some of the things that you can do are: • practice good hygiene • wash your hands. Use sanitizers • do not visit if you or your animal are not well •…

Caring for your Visiting Pet

Dogs are very social animals. It is natural for them to want to sniff out their surroundings, other dogs and people. Not everyone understands or appreciates this so we ask that dogs, when working in teams, meet outside the facility and have some time to get to know one another. You know your dog best…

Incident Reporting

Should you ever encounter a situation where a patient is injured or makes an accusation or if you or your pet are injured, you must report it immediately to facility staff. Make the decision quickly to terminate the visit if necessary. If something unusual has occurred during your visit let the PAWS Executive Director or…

Documentation when visiting

If you are documenting your visit, particularly for your practicum rounds do so as soon as possible after the visit, while it is fresh in your mind. You may want something your pet did that was particularly successful and that you would like to try again. In order to protect confidentiality only document statements about…

Tips for Group Visits

Although not as personal as one-to-one visits, group visits offer a greater number of residents the opportunity to enjoy time with your companion animal and to keep socialization with the other residents in a facility. Often people who keep to them and seldom speak with each other will engage in conversation and meaningful dialogue when…

Parts of the Visit

Approach Always approach the person slowly from the front. Smile. Do not startle them. Wait until the person seems ready to listen. Gently touch their hand or arm and make eye contact if needed. Ask if they would like a visit with the animal. Bring your animal closer. Watch for body language. Introduce yourself and…

Making a Great Impression

The first thing that people will notice about your team is your appearance. A well groomed team will be appreciated; people will notice that you care about yourself and feel more confident about your care for the animal. Bathing It is not necessary to bath your pet every time that you visit. In fact, if…

Visiting the Facility

YOU In order to feel positive about your time in the facility, take some time out for yourself before you visit. Do a Self-check including: 1. Make sure you are healthy on the day of the visit 2. Leave stresses and problems from the day at the door 3. Wear your ID tag at all…